The couch and chair are today the logo of psychoanalysis, the symbolic arrangement defining the ‘talking cure’. The Viennese original can still be viewed in the Freud Museum in London, but the therapeutic movement it represents has proliferated into a great variety of schools, each claiming a monopoly of the truth.

Therip’s main aim is to provide a forum for discussion between different schools in the fragmented world of psychoanalysis. Perhaps its most successful endeavour was The Klein/Lacan Dialogues (translated into French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish), for which it is now preparing a sequel.

In addition it holds an annual Conference and periodic seminars on topical issues. It is currently organizing a series of interviews with leading analysts who have helped to shape the development of  psychoanalysis in this country, under the title Being a British Psychoanalyst. Videos of these interviews are deposited at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine as a resource for future scholars; excerpts are available here.

If you would like to know more about Therip or to become a member, please email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Or write to Therip, c/o Audrey Cantlie, 5, Upper Wimpole Street, London W1G 6BP

theriphead2

  The couch and chair are today the logo of psychoanalysis, the symbolic arrangement defining the ‘talking cure’. The Viennese original can still be viewed in the Freud Museum in London, but the therapeutic movement it represents has proliferated into a great variety of schools, each claiming a monopoly of the truth.

  Therip’s main aim is to provide a forum for discussion between different schools in the fragmented world of psychoanalysis. Perhaps its most successful endeavour was The Klein/Lacan Dialogues (translated into French, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish).

  In addition it holds an annual Conference and periodic seminars on topical issues. It is currently organizing a series of interviews with leading analysts who have helped to shape the development of  psychoanalysis in this country, under the title Being a British Psychoanalyst. Videos of these interviews are deposited at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine as a resource for future scholars; excerpts are available here.